Archery

Discussion in 'Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms' started by Winbot, Nov 18, 2016.

  1. Man of the North

    Man of the North

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Posts:
    1,060
    Likes Received:
    1,646
    I have zero interest in compounds. I did recently see an article in Fur Fish Game that peaked my interest, it was promoting the use of the long bow in hunting with heavy weight arrows. The author hunted only on foot (as do I) and claimed that the long bow was good for the quick shots encountered in that type of hunting, as you would be rapidly nocking and shooting, and rarely if ever holding a draw. He stated that the long bow had less noise than the recurve, so the animal was less likely to startle before the arrow got there.
     
  2. Son of Odin

    Son of Odin

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    5,870
    Likes Received:
    3,086
    That is a good point. Do you shoot off the knuckle, or use a rest?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Winbot

    Winbot Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    13,078
    Likes Received:
    12,578
    No traditional bows get maintained properly period. If you really want a LH recurve I'll just link great deals here as they pop up.

    I really need to get my pullup bar installed! It's the #1 exercise for improving your bow proficiency, steadiness is natural if you're naturally under the exertion threshold at full draw.

    My bow has a 3 pin sight and I only use one of them which I know is set for 25 yards, the others are pushed to the very top and bottom out of the way. I don't need a 15 yard pin since I just set the target "on top of" the 25 yard for that. I'm thinking about doing a 35 yard pin as the second one (will be quite near the bottom) and removing the last pin entirely. I'm not crazy about sights on a bow in general but will admit they're very useful in low light conditions when your natural distance judgement is thrown off. The 4 and 5 pin sights are TERRIBLE, I think sticking with 1 or 2 is ideal since you still want that "no sights" style complete open profile instead of a big line of pins blocking everything.

    Right now I'm set to 55lb draw but really should think about just setting it to 70 before messing with the sights. Lobbing arrows at ultra distances (50+ yards with various heights) is super fun but if you're shooting a low power bow you have to artillery lob sooner than you'd like.
     
  4. Son of Odin

    Son of Odin

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    5,870
    Likes Received:
    3,086
    Artillery bow shots are so fun though! At least from a target shooting perspective. I'll find a new bow eventually, it's just not a priority right now. Basically just casually looking for some old lady selling her late husband's old school bear for 20 bucks.
     
    Manko likes this.
  5. OP
    OP
    Winbot

    Winbot Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    13,078
    Likes Received:
    12,578
    Ehh I would say a recurve is better than a longbow for snap shooting. Even though the longbow has maximum aesthetic it's awfully big and not friendly for deep woods hunting at all. Compounds suffered from this same problem (some still do) until parallel limb designs came around.

    Taking rapid multiple shots? Other than weird niche feral swine hunting I don't understand that mentality, putting a single broadhead into vitals is guaranteed devastation and anyone pursuing a humane kill knows to keep this mentality over whatever other arbitrary conditions you're imposing on yourself.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Winbot

    Winbot Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    13,078
    Likes Received:
    12,578
    Old ladies are better at phones than us and know market value on everything now.
     
  7. Son of Odin

    Son of Odin

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    5,870
    Likes Received:
    3,086
    Not out here in plainistan
     
  8. Man of the North

    Man of the North

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Posts:
    1,060
    Likes Received:
    1,646
    Hunting on foot you would generally need to nock, draw, and release within a second or two. Nothing to do with multiple shots. I'm going to see if I can find that article on line.
     
  9. Mohican

    Mohican

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    204
    Likes Received:
    111
    We got several Cabela's house brand recurves several years ago for under $100 apiece. Watch Cabela's or other s for sales. Samik also has several inexpensive recurves. A lot of these recurves can be purchased with extra limbs. Pro tip - if you are deer hunting with a recurve you don't need more than a 45 lb bow. Both myself and Son#2 are shooting fairly regularly, and good to go up to 30 yards instinctive shooting.

    Serious Compound bows - ie Mathews, Hoyt, etc should be considered a long term investment - Technology and new models in compounds happens so quickly that depreciation is terrible. Also, left over $1000 Hoyt, Mathews etc bows that are in stock the next spring or fall are often marked down 60%.

    A friend from high school is still hunting with a 1980 vintage Bear compound, still taking a deer every year with it. He also rocks 1980s era camo......
     
  10. Mohican

    Mohican

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    204
    Likes Received:
    111
    Everyone I know that still hunts with a bow keeps an arrow nocked.
     
    Dragoon likes this.
  11. Dragoon

    Dragoon

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2016
    Posts:
    150
    Likes Received:
    65
    Also, I teach archery classes.
     
  12. Dragoon

    Dragoon

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2016
    Posts:
    150
    Likes Received:
    65
    I agree with most of this. Longbows with a high arrow weight and draw weight seem to do better for distance, but a short recurve with about a chin distance draw length tend to do better for me at fast short range shots
    and brush hunting.
     
  13. Son of Odin

    Son of Odin

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    5,870
    Likes Received:
    3,086
    That's really all you need for instinctive, short range shooting. Longer recurves were more popular with guys who were stand hunting and routinely took longer shots. But if you're going spot and stalk at shorter ranges, a shorter recurve is way handier. One of those DIY longbow kits can work pretty good for that too.
     
  14. Man of the North

    Man of the North

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Posts:
    1,060
    Likes Received:
    1,646
    I looked back at that article I was talking about in Fur Fish Game. The author actually advocates something called a reflex deflex longbow, which I gather to be a longbow with a moderate re-curve that disappears when strung? He also argued that the traditional bows were better for the walking hunter as it is supposedly easier to shoot them from odd positions such as kneeling. I don't know, I have not even bought a bow yet.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    Winbot

    Winbot Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    13,078
    Likes Received:
    12,578
    Modern materials allows for that design, you can think of it as a hybrid between a longbow and recurve.

    You guys seem very interested in instinctive shooting, that's a whole different story with archery. It's not quite as simple as throwing a ball at a target without aid. There are more moving parts and thus deviations happening while using a bow. Your stance, grip and draw should be very consistent, at that point you will start to see your instinctive (or "open sights"/"no sights") skills begin to take off. Being consistent like that is great no matter what style of archery you're going for so you don't necessarily need to begin with instinctive shooting.

    A lot of guys start with a bow that has pin sight and move to open because of preference. If you are a hunter that is going for precision shots to the vitals of game animals it's not advised to do this without experience but for target shooting it's great. With my old bow I learned a lot about it by taking the sights off, it's very jarring at first but teaches your brain to think about arrow trajectory in a different way. I should just leave the sights off my old bow since I rarely use the thing and it could be used like that just for fun and a different style of practice.
     
  16. OP
    OP
    Winbot

    Winbot Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Posts:
    13,078
    Likes Received:
    12,578
    If you live in an area that isn't friendly to shooting arrows around (any suburb) you can still practice a garage or basement. You only need 10 yards to do it. It feels silly shooting that close but a lot of hunting shots end up being 10-15 yards away. Guys who have their 70lb draw bow sighted in for 35 yards have shot many an arrow over the shoulder of a deer because of this.

    Nugent said it best, the best archery practice is to shoot one perfect arrow a day. If it's your first shot of the day and it's perfect, you can stop if you'd like but at least make it that far. This goes back to a 10 yard shot, sounds boring but are you going to poke the bullseye with your first shot of the day at that range every time? This is part of what makes archery so interesting, it's so easy to get wrapped up in the technology and accessories and theory of long ranges and elevations but all the while you better not let your fundamentals go because that 'easy' shot is the one everyone seems to miss when it counts the most.
     
    Dragoon likes this.

Share This Page