Generation Shitlord

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by CHAD, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. Metalgod

    Metalgod

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    I've thought about it. I had a job where i did little, had a hateful uncaring unorganised bureaucracy. It drove me out in a year and a half.
     
  2. SimplyXY

    SimplyXY

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    Teaching is being de-skilled ahead of the automation of the profession. Harmonised programs have been in vogue for 20 years, along with nationalised testing and the gradual prioritisation of SJW shit over education.
    The average teacher now is only in the profession because their degree lead nowhere, is semi-literate, has little intellectual capcity or outside interest and is basically a state mandated child minder.
    My brother in law, my wife and I are all teachers (He's in primary, my wife did primary in Poland and EFL, I'm only in EFL) I am a 3rd generation teacher. Teachers are "working" harder than ever before but it's the pursuit of government targets and bureaucratic excellence rather than high educational standards. I doubt my brother in law would pass an old Eleven Plus exam from the 50s (grammar school entrance exam for 11-y-o).
     
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  3. Servo

    Servo

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    I went to good schools so I'm probably insensitive to how terrible the average public school is now. The average IQ for a person I graduated with is probably 107-110.
     
  4. Man of the North

    Man of the North

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    When I can afford to, I might just become a school bus driver in a remote district.
     
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  5. Samson

    Samson

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    I have a relative who is a teacher. Every year she sends a Christmas card with incorrect grammar or punctuation. REEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!
     
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  6. Servo

    Servo

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    If I ever get that couple mill "fuck you money" I'm not going to continue doing real work. I don't understand anyone that does. Put a bunch of it away for retirement and just work enough that you can stash several hundred away in savings every month. Either that, or devote my energies to political projects - something I want to be doing a good deal of the time even as an aside to full-time work.
     
  7. CHAD

    CHAD

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    Nothing makes me madder than the teachers who pretend they have the hardest job in the world. They aren't working 12 hour days, they just lie about reading essays while drinking wine and watching Netflix.

    They baby sit pretty much.
     
  8. Servo

    Servo

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    It's not a hard job but it is an important one and a teacher who actually helps stimulate a child's mind to have good math/writing/reasoning skills should be admired just like anyone else who does their job well.

    A lot of the time if a teacher is just babysitting it's because of the quality of the student body. If you're at a ghetto school, yes that is 90% babysitting, 10% telling the kids with a real brain to leave.
     
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  9. SimplyXY

    SimplyXY

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    Teaching well is a hard job.
    Planning and marking take forever if you care, and it is an emotionally and physically draining job - far harder than switching off after an office or manual job. Teaching 24 hours a week is the equivalent of working 40 hours a week in an office.
    The issue is that most teachers aren't that good. They are round faced Helens with nervous smiles who are proud of the fact that their job makes them cry all the time and are counting down the weeks until they have a nervous breakdown. The profession being so feminised means an awful lot of shit is tolerated in terms of paperwork and management, and as with most government backed jobs the focus is not on a good outcome but creating good results in measured metrics. The disconnect between what the government wants and actually educating the children is one of the main sources of stress for all children.
    One example is a state backed program I taught on in Italy. The goal of the programme was to have a 100% pass rate for an international language exam. Of course, students have different capabilities and aptitudes so 100% is not wholly realistic. How did we get around that? We effectively entered (for example) level 6 students in a level 3 exam. This created the 100% success required for the company I worked for to keep the contract. Of course, the students learnt nothing, got a certificate worth little and the programme produced nothing of value aside from transferring taxes into the hands of education administrators and the wealthy owners of the language school I was working for.
    Government programs in education, be they specific or general education, have a tendency to achieve the opposite of the normal goal and often function to transfer wealth to the already wealthy.
     

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