The Immediate Failure of "He Will Not Divide Us"

Discussion in 'News, Politics & World Events' started by Winbot, Feb 5, 2017.

Tags:
  1. Manko

    Manko

    Posts:
    751
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Tokyo
    In my experience, it takes at least 10 years to "recover" from the onset of major psychosis. That's with the best conditions & treatment. To get out of the delusions, gain insight, and rebuild in a way that prevents relapse & puts patients back into regular social life. 10 years, in the best of cases.

    That's why the mental health workers wear out.
     
    Michael likes this.
  2. Stearc

    Stearc

    Posts:
    1,092
    Trophy Points:
    49
    Location:
    The Dark Coast
    Tell that to LEOs. They need halfway houses not meds and do the best you can. It's no wonder that many are suicides as the system says, take pill, the family says stay away...I regularly deal with state hospital qualifiers on the street, but it's more important to fund food stamps and welfare than actually fund facilities for these folks who cannot function or really care for themselves....I've got little sympathy for mental health workers who claim burnout or legislators who fuck things up to begin with...
     
    Dolph, Michael and Chiron like this.
  3. Michael

    Michael

    Posts:
    1,254
    Trophy Points:
    90
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Yeah, it's crazy to me that we let the mentals loose to do as they will. Definitely makes you feel somewhat uneasey, can only imagine how a woman must feel encountering them. My oldest brother is schizophrenic - what's happened with him is Mum bought a rental property to rent out to him - a 2 bedroom place that just he lives in. Honestly, in my lifetime he's gotten far worse, he only goes out for shopping or to buy takeout, or to visit us and stay the night on saturdays. I think he was better in a halfway house honestly, more social interaction. Very little social interaction = crazy time, you live in a little bubble of your own thoughts.

    Ex-flatmate I knew who'd been to prison said prison's full of crazies.
     
  4. Stearc

    Stearc

    Posts:
    1,092
    Trophy Points:
    49
    Location:
    The Dark Coast
    Yes that's where they end up...jail or prison...and that helps...don't it.
     
  5. Winbot

    Winbot Administrator

    Posts:
    7,627
    Trophy Points:
    82
    Location:
    USA
    Terrible argument, the "comfy rating" of a job overrules virtually everything else. When you're working outside in the sun doing construction all day vs in an air conditioned office listening to random people talk, do you really think at the end of each day their thoughts are going to be the same? I am not even convinced someone can suffer burnout from something that doesn't actually produce results.
     
  6. RockMan

    RockMan

    Posts:
    2,673
    Trophy Points:
    107
    Location:
    NJ
    I disagree, we will discuss this later. At work.
     
  7. I worked in a factory making roof trusses. Most of the wooden beams weigh 10kg a piece, the complete trusses up to 130kg. Hard physical work lifting moderate weights all day.
    I worked in an office digitising paperwork. Nice people, dull job.
    I worked painting buildings.
    I have worked as an EFL teacher for 12 years.

    Teaching takes way longer to unwind from, it's more stressful and emotionally involving. Factory work was by far the most physically fatiguing. I was usually asleep by 830 or 9 pm. The most 'comfy' job was the office one, easy just to coast along not thinking about things. All the others offered far greater motivation but were, in different ways, much harder.
    I think burnout comes from being in a stress cycle of too great a magnitude. It can either be high amplitude stress (like an ER doctor or LEO) or long duration stress (Office Space). Humans are less well adapted to constant low level stress as it's a phenomenon of civilization. The output of a job matters little, it's the atmosphere and people that make it doable or horrific.
     
  8. Momentum

    Momentum

    Posts:
    395
    Trophy Points:
    54
    Location:
    Canada
    Office work is great. However workload is really hard to quantify/predict, so there is a lot more variability in the mental demand and stress. Also the variance in 'output' between people is way bigger in mental work than physical work, so the potential comfyness for smart unambitious people is huge. The easiest thing in the world is an office job you are overqualified for.
     
    CHAD and Manko like this.
  9. CHAD

    CHAD

    Posts:
    1,613
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Trump's America
    I have an office job at a supply company small enough that there's no HR rep to bother me or an IT guy to monitor my internet, so I can read content on my downtime. I have no issue working past 5pm or on the weekend which is like having a super power compared to the people who held my job before (a diverse hire from a staffing company, a single mom,a faggy millennial). I make more than I've ever made in my life, which isn't much, but I also regularly get raises, additional time off every year (started at two weeks, adds a day or two yearly in addition to roughly 2 weeks off from the regular holidays). My health insurance covers about 100% of my Testosterone, and I have plenty of time to lift, train, and shoot after work, while not having to get up mega early and fuck my sleep schedule.
     
    RockMan, Momentum, BigNoise and 2 others like this.
  10. Winbot

    Winbot Administrator

    Posts:
    7,627
    Trophy Points:
    82
    Location:
    USA
    [​IMG]
     
    SimplyXY, Michael and CHAD like this.
  11. RockMan

    RockMan

    Posts:
    2,673
    Trophy Points:
    107
    Location:
    NJ
    Heaven.

    Do not listen to @Winbot a 9-5 office job with tons of down time and little "work" is fantastic.
     
    CHAD, Winbot and Rudy like this.
  12. Son of Odin

    Son of Odin

    Posts:
    3,122
    Trophy Points:
    108
    Location:
    Midwest
    Depends on your goals but it is one option. As far as I'm concerned there's three appropriate approaches you could take to this and still be awesome.

    1)easy job that pays a solid middle class wage. This is assuming that you'll be coasting through easy days and using the extra energy either in side jobs or training(@Rudy's ideal job, @CHAD's actual job I think)

    2)self employed or small business partnership. Set your own hours, potentially working only a portion of the year. Not making a huge amount of money, but easily a living wage, plus side is that you're beholden to no man and that you can potentially work for only a portion of the year and use the other part to travel, train, or work a side hustle.(@Winbot lifestyle)

    3) middle ground. Find a job that allows you to build your own brand, either a career in sales or entrepreneurship. Requires heavy initial grinding, but mellows out over time. Higher potential earning, but also bigger time investment initially. You have to make time for training and probably won't be able to side hustle. (My path)
     
  13. sasquatch

    sasquatch Moderator

    Posts:
    929
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Location:
    Western Maryland
    I'm pretty close to #1. Most of my days are pretty easy mentally. Some days here and there can be mentally exhausting. I sit at a desk in a climate controlled building with a desk fan on me year round. I eat and I drink and recover throughout the day. Then I go train and hit all sorts of PRs.
     
    CHAD likes this.

Share This Page