Netflix & Chill

Winbot

Administrator
Staff member
How many sq ft of meadow/lawn per chicken?
10-20sqft per chicken for their permanent living space. That doesn't sound like much but if you have a moveable pen (you should) and park it on a different spot every day there is virtually unlimited clover/grass/whatever to eat as long as you don't have a huge flock. The average suburbanite should be able to keep 4-5 chickens without much fuss and that is with the front lawn being denied for social reasons.
 
I have 4 ducks. They are sitting on eggs now, hopefully I have some summer ducks here soon, and into the stew pot 16 weeks after that...
I've always wondered how an older duck would go in the stewpot or confit of the back legs, the flavour should get better and you don't really have to worry about the meat being tough for stewing or confit.
 

Iron

Well-known member
Yeah, older ducks aren't terrible once you boil them for a while. It takes a while to soften them up, but they aren't bad. I don't know if the flavor is better, but in a stew or something they are fine. Biggest problem with ducks is the plucking. It takes, roughly, a million years to pluck one.
 

Cossack

Well-known member
Yeah, older ducks aren't terrible once you boil them for a while. It takes a while to soften them up, but they aren't bad. I don't know if the flavor is better, but in a stew or something they are fine. Biggest problem with ducks is the plucking. It takes, roughly, a million years to pluck one.
Skin them?
 
Yeah, older ducks aren't terrible once you boil them for a while. It takes a while to soften them up, but they aren't bad. I don't know if the flavor is better, but in a stew or something they are fine. Biggest problem with ducks is the plucking. It takes, roughly, a million years to pluck one.
Oh really, not a big difference in taste? Well that's disappointing. The taste difference between a 2 yr steer and a 5-8yr steer is crazy.
 

RockMan

Well-known member
The latest season of Archer is useless. Since it stopped being a spy series it's gone downhill rapidly. The Vice season kinda worked as a spinoff, but it's basically unwatchable, self-reverential crap now.
Archer tanked hard when VICE started. I still watched it on insomnia nights but nothing is ever going to beat the first three seasons
 

Iron

Well-known member
Yeah, I have done that too, but not as good and harder to render the fat.

Oh really, not a big difference in taste? Well that's disappointing. The taste difference between a 2 yr steer and a 5-8yr steer is crazy.
I guess I need them side by side to do an accurate taste test. It is usually a while between duck eating. I will have to butcher one of the older ducks as well as the new ones when (if) the new ducks get big enough. I started them off with 6 eggs before I separated out the mothers, up to 12 eggs now. Hopefully end up with a good little batch of ducklings in a few weeks.
 

Momentum

Well-known member
Watching an interesting docuseries on Netflix called "Rotten". At first glance it's about food, but so far it has had a heavy focus on american agricultural challenges (mainly from Chinese competition).

Episode 1: Focused on how China is cutting their honey with different syrups to cut the cost, and finding ways to get it into the U.S.. Shows the impact on some american bee farmers who are struggling.

Episode 2: Is about peanut allergies. A lot of the episode is about a sneaky Indian restaurant owner who's restaurants served peanuts, to people who had told staff they were allergic (One got sick, one died). It turns out he was replacing almond powder with peanut powder to cut cost.

Episode 3: Is about a company that is getting around anti-dumping laws, and bringing cheap Chinese garlic into the U.S.. One of the ways that Chinese garlic is made cheaper is using prison labor to peel it.

I don't generally subscribe to the hall's view on trade (I'm generally anti-protectionist), but this show makes some good points. The case made in episode 1, is stronger than the one in episode 3 (in my opinion) since the quality of chinese garlic appears to be fine, and the U.S. uses prison labor as well (even if it's not the same scale/degree as China)
 

Dolph

Well-known member
Watching an interesting docuseries on Netflix called "Rotten". At first glance it's about food, but so far it has had a heavy focus on american agricultural challenges (mainly from Chinese competition).

Episode 1: Focused on how China is cutting their honey with different syrups to cut the cost, and finding ways to get it into the U.S.. Shows the impact on some american bee farmers who are struggling.

Episode 2: Is about peanut allergies. A lot of the episode is about a sneaky Indian restaurant owner who's restaurants served peanuts, to people who had told staff they were allergic (One got sick, one died). It turns out he was replacing almond powder with peanut powder to cut cost.

Episode 3: Is about a company that is getting around anti-dumping laws, and bringing cheap Chinese garlic into the U.S.. One of the ways that Chinese garlic is made cheaper is using prison labor to peel it.

I don't generally subscribe to the hall's view on trade (I'm generally anti-protectionist), but this show makes some good points. The case made in episode 1, is stronger than the one in episode 3 (in my opinion) since the quality of chinese garlic appears to be fine, and the U.S. uses prison labor as well (even if it's not the same scale/degree as China)
Can confirm that Rotten is a worthwhile watch.
 

Manko

Well-known member
Episode 3: Is about a company that is getting around anti-dumping laws, and bringing cheap Chinese garlic into the U.S.. One of the ways that Chinese garlic is made cheaper is using prison labor to peel it.
Chinese garlic dumping here is so extreme that it's hard to find garlic that isn't Chinese unless you look for it. Chinese garlic is easily 1/4 the price of local garlic, and all the processed garlic products (pre-ground, paste, etc) are 100% Chinese garlic. We end up having to pay equivalent of $20/kg for Aomori garlic when we can find it, and then peel & keep in a jar full of olive oil until we need it.

Honey is similar, but I'd never buy Chinese honey since a beekeeper friend warned me about that, and we get Argentine honey which is really good and cheaper due to FTA with the Argentinians.
 
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